© 2016 julieanderson55

Back to Basics

https://www.locaphile.wordpress.com

https://www.locaphile.wordpress.com

Despite the amount of money we are pouring into our public schools to improve our children’s education, our efforts are failing our children. We are creating a generation of depressed, anxiety ridden, unfulfilled young adults who know a lot about nothing and nothing about life (Secret, 2015). When we push to educate with quantity over quality, children begrudgingly will learn and will make progress, but the real question is, “Is it worth it?” When we force our children to memorize through repetition and desk work, we are cheating them out of their childhood experience and creating a dislike for learning and life. Schools are teaching our

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/105060603779536686/

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/105060603779536686/

students that learning is a chore and a burden, which is causing unwanted stress and disinterest in learning (Secret, 2015). As Socrates said, “…Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel”. Ryan stated in his initial post that learning should be holistic and incorporate the whole child’s interests in music, art, and humanities, not just STEM subjects.  He stated our goal should be to get students to want to learn and they will do the rest.

There are many extremely important lessons that cannot be measured or assessed but are crucial to our society. These lessons are being neglected in schools and homes today. They are the basics and fundamentals to our society. Do you remember the book by Robert Fulghum, “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten”? Wouldn’t our world be different if everyone adhered to that philosophy? No discussions of curriculum or state assessments, loss of funding or jobs. We should be focused on the fundamentals of life and creating well-rounded young adults, who want to learn. What if we focused on encouraging self-motivation, personalized physical skills/talent, and being able to make constructive, thought-out choices? Students would develop personal grit and be able to obtain their flows to engage effectively in their own lives. Cindy stated in her initial post that un-schooling or home-schooling with self-directed, adult-facilitated, outside learning builds confident, determined, adults who are focused on life. The individual nurturing and stimulating experiences allow for personalized monitoring and development. This results in deeper learning and fuller living.

https://dalishah.com/2012/05/15/the-positives-and-negatives-of-home-schooling-by-safiyah/

https://dalishah.com/2012/05/15/the-positives-and-negatives-of-home-schooling-by-safiyah/

When students are passionate about what they’re doing they need a lot less self-discipline to stay focused (Kohn, 83).

Mia stated in her initial post, it is important that students understand the balance of individuality and community, meaning the exploration of their connections with themselves and each other. This allows focused study on the individual student and the student’s interests, as well as how they connect and contribute as a group. When the students are engaged and allowed to have guided learning, all the knowledge learned is then used. Meaningful lessons with purposeful skills create deeper understanding and knowledge. In Albany Free School, the focus is on social interactions and literacy to be able to engage in society later in life (Martha). Similar to home-schooling, there are no state assessments or funding to add unwanted stress to children as they develop.

As a society, we need to get back to basics with education. It is important to incorporate the entire child’s interests and skills in their education to create a well-rounded, fully functional adult, who contributes positively to society. We need to get back to focusing on developing independent thinkers and doers who love life. When we develop confidence in our students, they find where they belong in life and where they fit in with society. Our children need an education that enlightens through purposeful exposure to experiences to develop who they are.

 

 

 

References:

Fulghum, Robert. “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten”. Retrieved 4/12/2016. (http://www.scrapbook.com/poems/doc/842.html).

Kohn, Alfie. (2015). Schooling Beyond Measure & Other Unorthodox Essays About Education. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Print.

Martha. (Nov 2015). “Albany Free School”. Retrieved 5/12/2016. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHuomy7V114)

Sacrates. Retrieved 4/12/2016. (http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/69267-education-is-the-kindling-of-a-flame-not-the-filling)

Secret Teacher. (May 2015). “Sats stress is Crushing Children’s Love of Learning”. The Guardian. Retrieved 4/12/2016. (http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/2015/may/16/secret-teacher-sats-stress-childrens-love-of-learning).

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